Theses

This page contains doctoral, masters' and undergraduate theses carried out in the Niv lab throughout time.

Doctoral theses

Shin, Y.S. (2020). The organization of experiences and its effects on episodic memory and decision-making. Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University.

Rouhani, N. (2020). Reward prediction errors shape memory during reinforcement learning. Department of Psychology, Princeton University.

Radulescu, A. (2020). Computational mechanisms of selective attention during reinforcement learning. Department of Psychology, Princeton University.

Chan, S.C.Y. (2016). Inference and neural representations of the current situation and the underlying causal structure of the world. Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University.

Eldar, E. (2014). Focus versus breadth: the effects of neural gain on information processing. Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University.

Gershman, S. J. (2013). Memory modification in the brain: computational and experimental investigations. Department of Psychology, Princeton University.

Niv, Y. (2007). The effects of motivation on habitual instrumental behavior. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem [PDF]

Masters' theses

Kao, D. (2012). Reward preference in video games. Department of Computer Science, Princeton University.

Senior theses

Jaskir, A. (2017). Learning how to learn: the interaction between attention and learning as a mechanism for dimensionality reduction in the brain. Department of Computer Science, Princeton University.

McDonald, K. (2015). Asymmetric learning rates for positive and negative feedback: a formal model comparison. Department of Psychology, Princeton University.

Leong, Y.C. (2013). Learning what's relevant in a largely irrelevant world: the role of selective attention in learning. Department of Psychology, Princeton University.